USA

Aperture Explorations in Albany

I arrived in Albany via the train from NYC. First stop, Juniors where they feature locally brewed beers and comfort style food. I ordered the poutine, a classic Canadian dish of French fries, cheese curds and gravy. I personally love poutine, and when I saw it had Buffalo chicken, It was my curiosity that got the best of me, and I had to order. 

Our Northern across the border neighbors would probably abhor this version, as the fries were lavished with buffalo sauce gravy, chopped chicken and blue cheese---maybe a tomato here and there if I recall. It arrived oversized, and I mean Extra extra large--Two people could lay their heads on this plate.  I almost did, but kept my composure instead.

albany-new-york-photographer-best-blogger-travel-explore.jpg

The next day I awoke to the sounds of black crows crowing, which was an eery early morning welcome to NY state's capital city. Um, thank you?

hudson-river-albany-new-york-travel-blog-view.jpg

Later on my friend, Amanda and I ventured into Troy for the day. The Hudson River was frozen and icy on top, waves of water stopped in motion. I was all wow! A sight I had never seen before. Rivers actually freeze?!

CP6A1688.jpg

Above the frozen waters, I saw the most unusual bridge, bulky and very 1920's industrial revolution appearing.

However, the Green Island bridge was actually completed in 1981 after it collapsed in March of 1977--spooky, and yet no one was actually injured. 

I took two photos of the bridge, to show you how changing the composition a bit will give a different feel to the image entirely.

 ISO  125 F2.8 1/3000    I chose to shoot at F2.8 to get a nice depth of field. it was a bright overcast day, and since I decided to shoot at such an open aperture, it was necessary to shoot at a low iso and high shutter speed to control how much light was coming in.      Compare this image with the one below. I used the same settings, but slightly changed what was in view, adding the fence as a "framing technique". Which image do you prefer?

ISO 125 F2.8 1/3000

I chose to shoot at F2.8 to get a nice depth of field. it was a bright overcast day, and since I decided to shoot at such an open aperture, it was necessary to shoot at a low iso and high shutter speed to control how much light was coming in. 

Compare this image with the one below. I used the same settings, but slightly changed what was in view, adding the fence as a "framing technique". Which image do you prefer?

 ISO  125 F2.8 1/3000     In this version of the Green Island Bridge, I chose to include the fence that was just in front of me to give more interest and depth to the image. 

ISO 125 F2.8 1/3000

In this version of the Green Island Bridge, I chose to include the fence that was just in front of me to give more interest and depth to the image. 

As I photographed the bridge, I took more of an interest to the fence ahead of me realizing the power it holds for a photographer. I often use them in my work. they are amazing at showing linear perspective giving a killer leading line, and when used effectively a fantastic vanishing point.

I took three photos of this fence using different settings and vantage points. Let's take a look at the results:

In the first image I used a wide open aperture of f1.8. In doing so,  it allows for a greater depth of field and isolates specifically the area of what you focus on, leaving what ever you aren't softly out of focus. Of course, keep in mind it also all depends on how far or near your subject is.  

 ISO 100 F1.8 1/2000   

ISO 100 F1.8 1/2000

 

For the second version of the fence, I shifted slightly to the right to include more of the archway of the bridge. I also used a smaller aperture (f4.0) to get more of the subject in focus. 

 ISO 100 F4.0 1/1000

ISO 100 F4.0 1/1000

In the third example, you'll notice that the fence and bridge are more in focus than the previous examples. This is because of the aperture size. (F13 in this case) Using a small aperture/higher number on the aperture ring of your camera provides a broader depth of focus--meaning most everything within the frame will be in focus.

 ISO 100 F13 1/60

ISO 100 F13 1/60

Playing with the aperture is one of the many ways to work creatively with photography. Try it for yourself! I'd be happy to see your results.